The relationship of parenting beliefs and behaviors to child and adolescent social skills and problem behaviors

Laura Silverman Liebling, Pace University

Abstract

The relationship between parenting beliefs and behaviors and children's and adolescent's social skills and problem behaviors is a topic that has not been fully explored by researchers. Many researchers focus on parenting beliefs when examining the relationship between parenting factors and childhood outcomes. Research suggests that examining both parenting beliefs and behaviors is important. Additionally, much parenting research focuses on European-American, middle- and upper-middle class parents. Research focusing on the relationship between parenting beliefs and behaviors and child and adolescent outcomes among families of diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds is needed. ^ The present research examined the relationship between parenting beliefs and behaviors and child and adolescent social skills and problem behaviors via parent report. The sample consisted of 76 faculty and staff members from a university in the Northeast, who responded to three questionnaires. Parent beliefs and behaviors were assessed with the Parent Role Questionnaire (PRQ) and Parenting Behaviors Questionnaire (PBQ). Parent report of child and adolescent social skills and problem behaviors was assessed with the Social Skills Rating System (SSRS). Participant marital, parental, and socioeconomic status, as well as gender, age, and ethnicity were secured. ^ Statistical analysis was used to determine the relationship between parenting beliefs and behaviors and child and adolescent social skills and problem behaviors among a demographically diverse sample. Results indicate that parenting beliefs and behaviors generally correspond. Demographic differences in the correspondence between beliefs and behaviors for some, but not all, parent role characteristics are found for parent status, gender, and age. ^ Overall, respondents perceive each of the six parent role characteristics to be important to the parent role, as determined by PRQ importance ratings. However, gender differences are found for bonding, responsivity, and sensitivity, with females reporting greater importance than males. Age differences are found for the importance of responsivity, with participants ages 40 and older reporting greater importance than participants ages 20 to 39. ^ Parent status, marital status, gender, and age differences for the correlation between bonding, responsivity, and sensitivity and parenting style are not found. Ethnic status differences are found. For African-American participants, the correlation between responsivity and sensitivity and the permissive parenting style is statistically significant. For multi-ethnic participants, the correlation between sensitivity and the permissive parenting style was statistically significant. ^ In the overall sample of parents, as PRQ importance ratings of responsivity increase, SSRS ratings of children's and adolescent's problem behaviors decrease. A relationship is not found between importance ratings for bonding, responsivity, and sensitivity and ratings of children's social skills. ^ Implications of the present research are discussed, including directions for assessment and intervention with parents and children. The present research contributes to school psychologists' knowledge base. Multicultural awareness is addressed, focusing on understanding parenting perceptions and behaviors of parents of diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Avenues for intervention with parents and children are discussed, with emphasis on enhancing parent involvement in assessment and intervention. The role of school psychologists and clinical child psychologists in facilitating parenting and child development outcomes is discussed. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Social|Psychology, Developmental

Recommended Citation

Laura Silverman Liebling, "The relationship of parenting beliefs and behaviors to child and adolescent social skills and problem behaviors" (January 1, 2004). ETD Collection for Pace University. Paper AAI3139324.
http://digitalcommons.pace.edu/dissertations/AAI3139324

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