Gender differences in parental representations and their effect on adolescent individuation and depression

Adriana DiMatteo, Pace University

Abstract

The study of the relationship between gender differences in parental representation in relation to gender, adolescent individuation, and depression has received little empirical attention despite the potential contribution such findings could have for our understanding of identity development, personality structure, and depression. The current study looked at these concepts in a sample of 263 high school students, ranging in age from 14 to 19 (118 males and 145 females). Hart's Inventory of Parental Representation was used to measure maternal and parental representation. Hart's scale, Positions in Adolescent Depression and Individuation was used to measure aspects of adolescent identity formation and types of depression associated with this process. It was hypothesized that there would be gender differences in types of depression, pathology, and parental representation. These predictions were fully supported. It was also hypothesized that there would be gender differences in parental representation and gender of participant. These findings were partially supported. There appears to be empirical support for the effect of parental representation on pathology. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Developmental|Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Adriana DiMatteo, "Gender differences in parental representations and their effect on adolescent individuation and depression" (January 1, 2009). ETD Collection for Pace University. Paper AAI3395649.
http://digitalcommons.pace.edu/dissertations/AAI3395649

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