A Comparison of the Parenting Perceptions of Indian Americans and Caucasian Americans

Ashmi Tiwari, Pace University

Abstract

The Parent Development Theory (PDT) was developed as a means to conceptualize the parenting perceptions of both parents and non-parents. The PDT, and related assessment instruments, identify six core characteristics that delineate behaviors that parents believe are important and one set of behaviors which are negative or not important. They consist of Bonding, Discipline, Education, General Welfare and Protection, Responsivity, Sensitivity, and Negativity. The present study assessed the parenting perceptions of 119 Indian Americans from the New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania Metropolitan areas and compared them with a group of 99 Caucasian Americans. The Parent Behavior Importance Questionnaire-Revised (PBIQ-R) as well as an acculturation measure, the Suinn-Lew Asian Self-Identity Acculturation Scale (SL-ASIA), were utilized to assess the impact of acculturation on Indian American participants' parenting. ^ Significant differences in parent ratings on the Negativity subscale were found between Indian Americans and Caucasian Americans generally, as well as when generation and acculturation level were accounted for. No significant differences in responses were found between Indian Americans and Caucasian Americans on the Bonding, Discipline, Education, General Welfare and Protection, Responsivity, and Sensitivity subscales. Overall significant differences in parent ratings, based on gender, were found on the Responsivity, Sensitivity, and Negativity subscales. No significant differences were found in parent ratings, based on gender, on the Bonding, Discipline, Education, General Welfare and Protection subscales. Significant differences were found in parenting perceptions of the Education subscale were found between males and females when culture was accounted for. However, no significant differences in parent ratings were found between males and females when gender was accounted for on the subscales of Bonding, Discipline, General Welfare and Protection, Responsivity, Sensitivity, and Negativity. Overall, the present study has a number of implications for the field of school-clinical psychology. For example, this study may aid clinicians in understanding the culture of their client, how parenting perceptions of others may differ from their own, and how Indian Americans may value parenting skills relative to Caucasian Americans. In the end, cultural differences among clients and between clients and clinicians need to be fully appreciated by the professional community in order for services to be effective. ^

Subject Area

Asian American Studies|Psychology, Social|Psychology, Clinical|Sociology, Individual and Family Studies

Recommended Citation

Ashmi Tiwari, "A Comparison of the Parenting Perceptions of Indian Americans and Caucasian Americans" (January 1, 2011). ETD Collection for Pace University. Paper AAI3447771.
http://digitalcommons.pace.edu/dissertations/AAI3447771

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