Ordered effects of technology education units on higher-order critical thinking skills of middle school students

Kern D Mojica, Pace University

Abstract

In this quasi-experimental quantitative study, 105 eighth grade students at a suburban middle school in New York State participated in a seven month-long project involving the ordered effects of the technology education units of Lego® Mindstorms™ NXT Robotics System, Digital Storytelling with Microsoft Windows Movie Maker, and the Marble Maze Challenge on the higher-order critical thinking skills as measured by the Cornell Critical Thinking Test, Level X. The 105 students were separated into six groups. Each group worked on the three problem-solving technology education units in a strategic order. This study extends the research of Lewis (1999) and Hansen (1995) in technology education curriculum reform and ventures into an unexplored area of ordered technology education curriculum implementation.^ It was concluded that the ordered effects of the technology education units of Lego® Mindstorms™ NXT Robotics System, Digital Storytelling with Microsoft Windows Movie Maker, and the Marble Maze Challenge on the higher-order critical thinking skills as measured by the Cornell Critical Thinking Test, Level X did not have a statistically significant effect on students’ higher-order critical thinking skills, nor did the effects vary by gender, age, or the learner’s academic category (this is the category a student is placed in, based on the level of their mathematics and science courses). ^ Although quantitative findings did not show statistically significant effects of the ordered technology education units of Lego® Mindstorms™ NXT Robotics System, Digital Storytelling with Microsoft Windows Movie Maker, and the Marble Maze Challenge, the results of this study provide signs that a controlled process of strategic, ordered implementation of Lego® Mindstorms™ NXT Robotics System, Digital Storytelling with Microsoft Windows Movie Maker, and the Marble Maze Challenge has a positive effect on students’ higher-order critical thinking skills. There are also indications that females benefited more from the use of the three technology education units than males.^

Subject Area

Education, Middle School|Education, Vocational

Recommended Citation

Kern D Mojica, "Ordered effects of technology education units on higher-order critical thinking skills of middle school students" (January 1, 2010). ETD Collection for Pace University. Paper AAI3468158.
http://digitalcommons.pace.edu/dissertations/AAI3468158

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