Correlates of Dysregulation and Parental Representations among Emerging Adults with Substance Use Problems

Erika Lubliner, Pace University

Abstract

The primary aim of this study was to examine the relationship between correlates of dysregulated behavior, parental representations and substance problems in a sample of young adults (18-30 years old) seeking psychotherapy at an outpatient university-based clinic. Participants (N =525) were administered several self-report questionnaires that assessed substance use (PAI), aggression (PAI), maladaptive coping (derived from PAI) and parental representations (IPR). Results indicated that drug dependence and alcohol dependence were significantly correlated with elevated scores for all PAI indices of aggression and maladaptive coping. Hierarchical regression analyses suggest that maladaptive coping is a strong predictor of substance use beyond the documented relationship between aggression and substance use problems. Further, a significant correlation was found between substance use problems and maternal representations of narcissistic and weak and paternal representations of his being in need of repair. Deeper understanding of the correlates of substance use disorders in emerging adults may contribute to the development of targeted therapeutic interventions. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Developmental|Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Erika Lubliner, "Correlates of Dysregulation and Parental Representations among Emerging Adults with Substance Use Problems" (January 1, 2012). ETD Collection for Pace University. Paper AAI3533510.
http://digitalcommons.pace.edu/dissertations/AAI3533510

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