Understanding the Relationship between Perceived Bonding and Stress in Parents of Young Children: A Study of Intergenerational Transmission of Parenting Behavior

Lauren Greenbaum, Pace University

Abstract

This study explored the way in which intergenerational transmission of parenting behavior takes place in parents of young children. Specifically, it explored how one's level of perceived parental bonding with their own parents affects their perceived amount of parental stress when they become parents themselves. Participants included 109 mothers and father who had at least one child under the age of 12. Findings were mixed, and indicated that there was a significant interaction between parental care and parental control. Specifically, findings showed that individuals who perceived their parents as both caring and overprotective or controlling, experienced the least amount of parental stress. Additionally, it was found that one's perceived amount of paternal care was significantly related to fewer reported parent child dysfunctional interactions. However, perceived maternal and paternal care and control were not significantly related to currently experienced total stress or parental distress. Clinical implications of these findings are discussed. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, General

Recommended Citation

Lauren Greenbaum, "Understanding the Relationship between Perceived Bonding and Stress in Parents of Young Children: A Study of Intergenerational Transmission of Parenting Behavior" (January 1, 2014). ETD Collection for Pace University. Paper AAI3581353.
http://digitalcommons.pace.edu/dissertations/AAI3581353

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