Sequential Shape Flow Facial Patterns Among 12-Month-Olds Correspondent to Maternal Dependency and Self-Criticism: A Microanalytic Application of the Kestenberg Movement Profile

Yelena Bromberg, Pace University

Abstract

The study of infant self-regulation through the microanalytic lens of self-contingency, or the predictability of a person's behavior over time, during mother-infant interaction, has yielded important findings regarding the effects of maternal depression (Beebe et al., 2007, 2008; Beebe, Lachmann, Jaffe, et al., 2012; Reale, 2011). Elements of a systematic nonverbal assessment tool derived from movement language – the Kestenberg Movement Profile (KMP; Kestenberg, 1975) – were employed to expand upon these findings. Specifically, the shape flow facial patterns of 71 infants, during face-to-face interaction with their mothers when they were 12-months of age, were coded frame-by-frame. Frequency analyses identified trends between specific types of infant facial movements and maternal depressive vulnerability, as assessed by the Depressive Experiences Questionnaire (DEQ; Blatt, D'Afflitti, & Quinlan, 1976), while lag sequential analyses, using the Yule's Q, identified relationships between infant self-contingency across sequences of facial movement and maternal DEQ scores. The findings support dyadic and dynamic systems models, underscore the significance of sequence in movement, and illustrate the sensitivity and versatility of the KMP for future research.^

Subject Area

Psychology

Recommended Citation

Yelena Bromberg, "Sequential Shape Flow Facial Patterns Among 12-Month-Olds Correspondent to Maternal Dependency and Self-Criticism: A Microanalytic Application of the Kestenberg Movement Profile" (January 1, 2015). ETD Collection for Pace University. Paper AAI3664562.
http://digitalcommons.pace.edu/dissertations/AAI3664562

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