EXPLORING EXECUTIVE STRESS; CAUSES, COSTS, COPING MECHANISMS AND CURES: A GENERAL SYSTEMS APPROACH

JAMES W GREENWOOD, Pace University

Abstract

The perspectives of general systems theory add new dimensions to the problem of executive stress, a subject on which there has been a veritable explosion of writing since the seminal work of Hans Selye in 1950. Upon analysis, much, if not most, of the literature on the subject reveals the basic linearity of the thinking of the contributors. In a general systems framework, the causes, effects, costs, coping mechanisms and cures are seen to be multiplex in nature and operating in a multitude of dynamic, interacting, cybernetic systems which, in spite of the plethora of writing, are still insufficiently understood. The magnitude of the measurable costs and the enormity of the unmeasurable costs underline the significance of the problem and demand greater attention by executives in both private and public sectors. Further research in a general systems framework would provide an opportunity for developing a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of executive stress and for bringing it under control, thus converting a highly prevalent malady into a useful tool of management. ^

Subject Area

Mental health

Recommended Citation

JAMES W GREENWOOD, "EXPLORING EXECUTIVE STRESS; CAUSES, COSTS, COPING MECHANISMS AND CURES: A GENERAL SYSTEMS APPROACH" (January 1, 1977). ETD Collection for Pace University. Paper AAI8107108.
http://digitalcommons.pace.edu/dissertations/AAI8107108

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