MANAGERIAL MOTIVATION OF BLACK COLLEGE STUDENTS ASPIRING TO CAREERS IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT: AN APPLICATION OF MINER'S ROLE MOTIVATION THEORY

EUGENE H NELLEN, Pace University

Abstract

The presence of black people in executive positions in American corporations is low, accounting for less than four percent of the total management population. In 1984, among all students who took the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT), only 3.9% were black. Speculation varies as to why this situation exists, ranging from discrimination to lack of motivation. The focus of this study was to measure the level of motivation to manage among black college students, a source of future managerial talent, to determine if there is a lack of this characteristic among black college students. To measure this trait, Miner's Role Motivation Theory was applied, using the Miner Sentence Completion Scale (MSCS).^ The study was designed to determine (1) what differences, if any, in motivation to manage exist between black and white college students; (2) what differences, if any, in motivation to manage exist between black students attending traditional black colleges and those attending integrated colleges; (3) what differences, if any, exist between black students who identify with a role model who is a business manager and those who do not; and (4) what demographic characteristics correlate with MSCS scores.^ The total sample was composed of 441 college students attending 25 colleges and universities in the north and south. 57.4% (253) of the sample were black college students.^ Tests from the data show that (a) black college students have higher motivation to manage scores than white college students; (b) black male college students have motivation to manage scores considered desirable for success in business management; and (c) role models are important in affecting the aspirations, goals and motivation to manage of black youth.^ No differences were found in motivation to manage between black students attending traditional black colleges and those attending integrated colleges; and there is no evidence that demographic characteristics correlate with motivation to manage scores.^ It was concluded that motivation to manage is not a cause for the low level of black presence in corporate hierarchy or for the low level of black students seeking entrance into graduate schools of business administration.^ Implications of these conclusions and recommendations for further research are provided. ^

Subject Area

Business Administration, Management

Recommended Citation

EUGENE H NELLEN, "MANAGERIAL MOTIVATION OF BLACK COLLEGE STUDENTS ASPIRING TO CAREERS IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT: AN APPLICATION OF MINER'S ROLE MOTIVATION THEORY" (January 1, 1986). ETD Collection for Pace University. Paper AAI8602311.
http://digitalcommons.pace.edu/dissertations/AAI8602311

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