A STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TYPE A CORONARY PRONE BEHAVIOR AND CERTAIN JUNGIAN PSYCHOLOGICAL TYPES

ROBERT BRUCE ADAMS, Pace University

Abstract

There is support in the review of the literature that there is a psychological basis for how an individual might handle the effects of stress. Using Carl Jung's typology as a basis, the House Paradigm of Stress Research was modified to reflect the hypothetical dichotomous results expected by the application of Jung's theory in the form of the outcomes of responses to stress being divided into Type A and B coronary prone behavior as defined by Friedman and Rosenman. Data was collected using a vehicle created by Matteson and Ivancevich for stress scores to indicate Type A or Type B behavior and by using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator for Jungian typological classification.^ Various statistical tests were performed to determine whether there were any Jungian types that tested differently from others with regard to Type A behavior.^ Findings indicate that the House Paradigm modifications are acceptable due to the fact that Extraverts were found to have higher Type A scores than Introverts and that Feelers may be more susceptible to stress than other types. This latter finding, however, is not conclusive due to small sample sizes.^ The impact of these findings on business can be substantial when enlightened managements use the knowledge to better match the person to the job to avoid the harmful effects of stress.^ The body of data collected is examined and areas for future research are indicated. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Personality

Recommended Citation

ROBERT BRUCE ADAMS, "A STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TYPE A CORONARY PRONE BEHAVIOR AND CERTAIN JUNGIAN PSYCHOLOGICAL TYPES" (January 1, 1987). ETD Collection for Pace University. Paper AAI8721013.
http://digitalcommons.pace.edu/dissertations/AAI8721013

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