A comparison of self-concept scores in secondary -aged hearing -impaired students enrolled in mainstreamed and self-contained classes

Barbara S Cohen, Pace University

Abstract

The main hypothesis of the present study is whether there would be differences in self-concept in hearing impaired students in mainstreamed and self-contained classes. The Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale (modified for the hearing impaired) was administered to 79 junior high and high school students in mainstreamed and self-contained classes. Comparisons also were made between the classes for the Performance IQ (WISC-R or WAIS-R), reading comprehension, math calculation, and level of hearing loss since these were factors on which class selection was often based.^ T-tests showed that Performance IQ, reading comprehension, and math calculation were significantly higher and level of hearing loss was significantly lower in mainstreamed classes. Regarding the main research question, using a 2 x 2 analysis of covariance strategy, it was found that there were no significant differences in the mean total and subscale self-concept scores between hearing impaired students in mainstreamed and self-contained classes. There were no significant differences found between grade levels (junior high and high school), gender, and self-concept, with the exception that high school level students had significantly higher mean scores on the Behavior subscale of the Piers-Harris than junior high school students. There was also no significant correlation found between self-concept scores, Performance IQ, and academic achievement scores, except for one significant positive correlation between Performance IQ and the Happiness/Satisfaction subscale score.^ Reasons for the general lack of significant differences may be: (1) little actual difference between students in mainstreamed and self-contained classes, in that hearing impairment may create similarity in background and experiences; (2) measurement inadequacies of the Piers-Harris; and/or (3) general similarity in educational settings of the hearing impaired students involved in this study. These similarities include common location (both mainstreamed and self-contained classes were located in the same public schools), peer contact between mainstreamed and self-contained students, and several of the same staff members working with both classes. These common elements may counteract the differences that were present in the two class settings. ^

Subject Area

Education, Educational Psychology|Education, Special|Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Barbara S Cohen, "A comparison of self-concept scores in secondary -aged hearing -impaired students enrolled in mainstreamed and self-contained classes" (January 1, 1991). ETD Collection for Pace University. Paper AAI9239166.
http://digitalcommons.pace.edu/dissertations/AAI9239166

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