The relationship between the PASS model (Planning, Attention, Simultaneous and Successive Processing), the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition and reading achievement in school -aged children

Elizabeth Anne Volpe, Pace University

Abstract

The present study addressed the relationship of the Das-Naglieri Cognitive Assessment System (based on the PASS model), the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-III)--(a traditional intelligence test) and two subtests of the Woodcock Johnson Psychoeducational Battery-Revised (Word Attack and Letter-Word Identification). More specifically, reading decoding skills were predicted from the WISC-III and the DN:CAS using hierarchical regression analyses. It was hypothesized that the WISC-III, when organized according to Bannatyne's factors would be a significant predictor of reading decoding skills, as evidenced by the literature. In addition, it was hypothesized that the DN:CAS, based on the PASS model, would also contribute to the prediction of reading, as evidenced by the literature. It should be noted that normative data was unavailable for the Das-Naglieri Cognitive Assessment System. Therefore, a scoring system was developed which addressed both speed and accuracy.^ In general, the results were quite consistent with the above hypotheses. More specifically, it appears as if the Bannatyne factors and the PASS model are measuring much of the same aspects of intelligence. Thus, many of the specific subtests are highly correlated with each other. In turn, both sets were overall significant predictors of reading decoding skills as measured by both Word Attack and Letter-Word Identification subtests of the Woodcock Johnson Psychoeducational Battery-Revised. However, there were also definitive significant individual predictors of note which included Bannatyne's categories of Acquired Knowledge and Conceptualization and the PASS model scores reflecting Sequential Processing and Planning. In addition, the Attention score of the PASS model was not a significant predictor of reading decoding skills. Similarly, the Simultaneous Processing score did not act as a significant predictor of reading decoding skills.^ Such research is beneficial to increase the understanding of cognitive processing profiles among learning disabled, emotionally disturbed and normal school aged children that are indicative of reading disabilities. In addition, it supports the utility of the PASS model in predicting reading disabilities. However, since the normative data of the DN:CAS was not available for this study, it may be conservatively concluded that the PASS model may act as a supplement to the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition. The additional knowledge provided from the PASS model will allow professionals to identify reading difficulties and to subsequently recommend appropriate remediation according to the specific processing deficits of each child. ^

Subject Area

Education, Tests and Measurements|Education, Educational Psychology|Education, Reading|Psychology, Psychometrics

Recommended Citation

Elizabeth Anne Volpe, "The relationship between the PASS model (Planning, Attention, Simultaneous and Successive Processing), the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition and reading achievement in school -aged children" (January 1, 1996). ETD Collection for Pace University. Paper AAI9701162.
http://digitalcommons.pace.edu/dissertations/AAI9701162

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