Document Type

Article

Abstract

Academic support professionals have long recognized the benefits of imparting a greater knowledge of learning skills to law students as a way to enhance their ability to learn the law. Consequently, the science and pedagogy of academic support have become a staple of legal education. However, while the need for academic support remains a constant, the identification of those in need of academic support programs continues to be in flux. Growing social awareness of an expanded definition of diversity, recent decisions such as Hopwood v. Texas and the proliferation of academic support programs have expanded the definition of the academic support student.