Behavioral interventions in preschool: A naturalistic comparison of impulsive, aggressive, conduct problems, and social problems children

Deborah Ann Macina, Pace University

Abstract

This study attempted to measure the association among children's behavioral characteristics, teacher interventions, and the effectiveness of teacher interventions in a sample of twenty-one children, three to five years old, in a preschool partial hospitalization program. The parents/guardians of the children were administered the Conners' Parent Rating Scale (CPRS) and parent Child Behavior Checklist (CECL) in order to determine the children's relative standing in regard to conduct problems, social problems, impulse control problems, and aggression. A sampling of events procedure was used in which an intervention was coded every two minutes for type, success, and recurrence of behavior. Chi Square analyses indicated that the group rated higher in conduct problems displayed significantly less aggressive behaviors and significantly more social issues behaviors than those children without conduct problems. The group rated higher in social problems received significantly less time-out than children without social problems. Redirection was significantly more successful with children rated higher in impulsive control problems than with other children. Several trends developed as well. The group rated higher in impulsive control problems tended to display more behaviors related to social issues and tended to receive more time-outs than the other children. The group rated higher in aggression tended to receive less redirection than the other children. Verbal reprimands tended to be less successful with children rated higher in social problems than with other children, but more successful with children rated higher in conduct problems than with other children. This research lends information to support the interactional model of personality, and adds to the areas of school psychology and behavioral management with preschoolers; by focusing on the interaction between the child and the situation. This research also helps to strengthen the link between assessment and intervention, and therefore contributes to the effectiveness of behavior management programs. As a result, behavioral programs will be able, to utilize the interventions that are more effective with certain personality and behavioral characteristics. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Behavioral|Education, Early Childhood|Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Deborah Ann Macina, "Behavioral interventions in preschool: A naturalistic comparison of impulsive, aggressive, conduct problems, and social problems children" (January 1, 2001). ETD Collection for Pace University. Paper AAI3014331.
http://digitalcommons.pace.edu/dissertations/AAI3014331

Share

COinS

Remote User: Click Here to Login (must have Pace University remote login ID and password. Once logged in, click on the View More link above)