Attachment style, self-esteem, and subjective well-being among late adolescents

Tracy Turkisher, Pace University

Abstract

This study was designed to investigate the relationships among attachment style, self-esteem, and subjective well-being in late adolescent college students. The Adult Attachment Scale designed by Collins and Read (1990), was employed to assess attachment style. Other measures included Resenberg's Self-Esteem Inventory (Resenberg, 1965), and the Satisfaction With Life Scale (Diener, Emmons, Larsen, & Griffin, 1985).^ Subjects were 180 urban students aged 16-20. Each participant was asked to complete a survey packet containing the aforementioned instruments.^ Utilizing attachment theory (Bowlby, 1988) and self-in-relation theory (Jordan, Kaplan, Miller, Stiver, & Surrey, 1991) as theoretical frameworks, it was hypothesized that secure attachment style among late adolescent women would be significantly related to measures of self-esteem and subjective well-being. It was further hypothesized that these relationships would be stronger for late adolescent women than for late adolescent men.^ All hypotheses were confirmed wholly or in part. Results indicated that late adolescent girls who reported secure attachment also tended to report high levels of self-esteem and subjective well-being. Further, these relationships, although significant among men, were stronger for late adolescent women in this study.^ Implications for school psychologists were addressed as well. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Developmental

Recommended Citation

Tracy Turkisher, "Attachment style, self-esteem, and subjective well-being among late adolescents" (January 1, 1994). ETD Collection for Pace University. Paper AAI9413151.
http://digitalcommons.pace.edu/dissertations/AAI9413151

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