Comments

S.J.D Dissertation, Doctor of Juridical Science (S.J.D.) in Environmental Law Degree, under the supervision of Professor Ann Powers, Pace University School of Law

Document Type

Dissertation

Abstract

The primary goal of this study is to strengthen the participatory environmental rights model in Principle 10 of the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development and similar regional provisions and to promote International Environmental Justice. The first part of the argument in this dissertation is that the three pillars of participatory environmental rights in Principle 10 of the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development and similar regional provisions need to be strengthened with a fourth environmental rights pillar in the form of a right of access to broad environmental education, which includes anti-corruption education, especially public sector corruption, in order for such participatory rights to contribute to environmental sustainability in developing countries in Africa. The second part of the argument in this dissertation is that a global environmental justice legal regime is required in order for developing countries in Africa to achieve environmental sustainability. This study is primarily a theoretical evaluation, and the rationale for this type of research is that this author considers that a law is only as effective as its weakest part. Therefore, inadequately developed laws will have limited effectiveness when implemented. The focus of this study is developing countries in Africa and Nigeria is used as the case study.